Pizza nails closeup shot.  Because goddamn am I proud of that hand-painted pizza action. 

Cosmic pizza bling.

The very talented Laura of Polish All the Nails! recently launched a web store selling nail charms and glitter: The Sparkly Shop.  She sent me some of her charms to check out, and they’re all pretty great—I had trouble deciding which to use first.

These nails feature the enamel pizza charms.  They’re small and flat enough to fit easily on the nails, which is nice for when you don’t feel like getting too crazy with shit. And they’re very cute.  You can use the code LADY15 for 15% off your purchase from The Sparkly Shop, if you need these in your life.

Q

Anonymous asked:

Is that guy your husband??

A

Nope, neither of the guys in the last post are my partner.  They’re my cousin and an old friend his (and of mine), who were both down for some nail art.

My man has promised to let me paint his nails sometime soon, and I’ll definitely post that here. He’s pretty much my biggest fan.

Besties!

I love a man who’s confident enough to rock the polish.

Not even sure what to call these babies.

I made my veggies matte. Think I like them better this way.

Q

Anonymous asked:

I've gathered from your tutorials that you tape around your nails while doing gradients, but whenever I've tried this it ends up being more work than it's worth. How do you do it? Do you do one finger at a time or cut the tape to go around the curve a bit at the base of your nail or am I just naturally horrid at this? I'm considering just painting glue around my nails and then base coat/colour applying while the glue dries so I can peel it off. My cuticles are so horrid after I try to gradient.

A

Gradient clean up is the worst, isn’t it? I don’t always tape my nails for gradients, but I usually do if I’m using a dark or skin-staining polish. I use the technique laid out in this video, which does leave little gaps at the bottom corners due to the nail’s natural curve, but otherwise does a good job. I also try not to sponge polish directly over the bottom edge of my nail, since it’s so hard to clean up around my cuticles and usually I want the line of the gradient to start a little higher up the nail anyway.

Another thing I like to do is paint cuticle oil around the edges of my nails before I do a gradient. It keeps the polish from sticking to my skin quite so well and as a bonus helps moisturize. I have one of these nail oil pens and it works particular well for this.

Q

Anonymous asked:

How do you recommend removing dark nail polish without leaving stains?

A

In my experience a certain amount of staining is inevitable for people who wear polish all the time, but there are definitely things that help minimize it. First and foremost, always wearing base coat. I didn’t really wear base coat when I first started out because it seemed unnecessary, but it not only prevents staining, it also helps polish adhere to the nail and last longer. Also, if you’re wrapping your tips with polish (which you probably should do if you want the polish to last!), make sure to wrap the base coat too.

I recommend using pure acetone or at least an acetone-based polish remover to remove polish. It’s harsher than other removers, but it works much better, and so you end up having a shorter period of exposure to the stuff.  With a dark or stain-prone polish I first saturate a cotton ball in acetone, then I start at the base of the nail and wipe towards the tip. Then I turn the cotton ball to a clean side and repeat. Doing it this way, instead of scrubbing back and forth over the nail, helps keep the polish from smearing over your skin and staining. I finish up by using a q-tip dipped in acetone to scrub around the cuticle and at any areas that need cleaning up (and then moisturize, because that shit is really drying).

Every now and then I also take an old toothbrush and some toothpaste and scrub my nails, like I’m thoroughly brushing a giant tooth. It seems to help with staining, although maybe I’m just crazy.

Q

Anonymous asked:

I really really love your blog. When I first saw some of your posts I was just like "OMG, WOW ... seriously now..." How long does it usually take to make a nail design? And where do you get inspiration from?

A

Thank you so much! I know that OMG-WOW-seriously feeling well, I get it all the time when I see the work of talented artists and it’s really great to be able to inspire that in someone else.

How long it takes to do a design really depends on how complex it is and how much I fuck it up along the way. A complicated design might take a few hours, a simple one 30 minutes. I’ve gotten a lot faster at painting nails over time, and some things that used to take me forever (like gradients) I can now crank out in no time.

I get my inspiration from all over the place.  I follow many nail artists on tumblr and elsewhere, and I get a lot out of seeing their work. But I also follow tons of blogs dedicated to non-nail art subjects— fine art, science, fashion, history, etc— and I draw on those for ideas too.  I love to make nail art that hasn’t been made before and that incorporates concepts from all over: infectious disease, textiles, photographynature, history, and so on.

Don’t fuck around with Lady Crappo.

With thanks to my awesome cousin who made me aware that bits and pieces of mini figures can be bought at some game stores (and they can then be painted and affixed to my nails).

Q

Anonymous asked:

Can you do a new simple one with a very little bit of details, like not a little bit! I just mean not complicated ahah don't get me wrong i love your work! Its awesome!!

A

I’m sorry, I’m not really sure what you’re asking for. Do you want a simplified tutorial of a specific design?

Q

Anonymous asked:

Hi! I think you're very talented at nail art!!! I love all of your posts. Just a question; How many years do you have you been doing this??? (I gues you have a lot of experience!!!) =] .

A

Thank you very much! I’ve been doing nail art for about two years. I only started doing freehand stuff February of last year though; before that I just did tape manicures.  I’ve always enjoyed making art, and I had a fair bit of experience drawing and painting before I ever got into this nail stuff, which has helped me a lot.

Okay, since a few people asked, here’s the tutorial. There are a lot of tutorials for galaxy nails out there, so if this one doesn’t work for you, just google for others!

I started with a base of a lighter blue (most people start with a dark base and sponge on some highlights later, but I was playing around with how this would work). I sponged on a navy blue (Zoya Sailor) randomly, and then sponged on a different navy with a cooler tone (OPI I Saw…U Saw…We Saw…Warsaw), and then added some black. I tried to make each nail different and leave some spaces that weren’t totally opaque. Next, I used an off-white polish (OPI My Vampire Wears Buff) and a brush to add some random cloud-like shapes. I sponged over the white areas with a red jelly (Essie Clambake), then used a brush to add some purple around the edges of the red. With white polish and the tip of my smallest brush, I made tiny dots for stars all over the nails. I then beefed up a couple of the stars with more white polish.

The last step is the hardest, and I didn’t go into detail here because I’ve already made a tutorial on how to do this geometric design, called asa-no-ha (sorry if this veers into How to Draw an Owl territory). If the asa-no-ha is too complicated for you, you could get a similar effect with a much simpler geometric design.

Ask and ye shall receive. I did galaxy nails as requested, although I’m not sure I like them. Maybe it’s just that I’ve seen galaxy nails so many places that it’s hard to feel like mine are anything special? Or maybe it’s just that I’m not happy with my line work on that accent finger. But that’s how it goes sometimes. I did take pictures & will put together a tutorial if you folks are interested.